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Posts Tagged ‘WIP’

Is $7 Billion Enough To Clean Up The Bay?

This month, the Chesapeake Bay Executive Council met in Richmond to discuss, among things, progress being made on efforts to clean up the Chesapeake Bay. Data released that same day indicates that Virginia is on target to meet interim cleanup goals set in 2009.

 

What Is Next For the Virginia Chesapeake Bay WIP

Image via Wikipedia Phase II of Virginia’s Watershed Implementation Plan: Where are we now, where are we heading, and how do we get there? Work on Virginia’s Watershed Implementation Plan (“WIP”), specifically, the required implementation of Phase II, has begun…sort of.

 

VA WIP Phase I, Done. Phase II, Where to Start?

Last December, EPA and the Commonwealth of Virginia reached agreement on the state’s proposed Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP). In evaluating the WIP, EPA found that the WIP met nutrient and sediment allocations for each basin in the final TMDL. EPA also accepted that Virginia was committed to implementing aggressive WWTP upgrades, a more accountable urban [...]

 

Virginia’s revised WIP submitted…but will it be enough?

On  Monday, the Commonwealth of Virginia submitted a revised Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP) to the EPA, meeting EPA’s established deadline. However, in the revised draft, Secretary of Natural Resources Doug Domenech,

 

EPA Sediment Limits and Virginia’s “Pollution Diet” Planning

On August 13, 2010, EPA announced draft sediment limits for the jurisdictions and major river basins in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, including those affecting Virginia, its rivers and the Eastern Shore. Virginia, along with other watershed states and the District of Columbia, are expected to use the limits, along with those issued for nitrogen